What inspired you to first start making music? And how did you come to be in your current incarnation? Or if you prefer, a brief bio about you.

BP (vocals/guitar): I used to “sing” in a band called ‘Dinosaurs Are Shit Dragons’ and I always found that it helped ease my anxiety and depression a bit. Channeling that negativity and sadness into words that I then shouted in a room over a lot of noise helped it, so I wanted to just get into a practice room and do that again. There was a lot going on at the time, after the Brexit vote and the rise in people acting all gammony and intolerant to each other and I needed an outlet for that.

My friend CS (Drums) had mentioned he was looking for someone to make a racket and dragged DW (Bass) to join us. It was just a fun project we thought would play locally now and again, nothing more.

We picked the band name with the expectation that it didn’t matter having ‘fucking’ in the name as it wasn’t a serious thing. But we got a good response from our gigs, and the more songs we wrote the more we actually liked the music we were making ourselves.

We recorded an EP and the song ‘Stop Being Dickheads To Each Other’ surprisingly (to us) it got a good response, it was supported by Tom Robinson at 6music, getting played on 6music and added to the ‘BBC Introducing Best of 2019’ list.

And now here we are at our second EP, that is again being self released on our own label again.

Provide us with some info about your latest release…

BP: ’Straight Wealthy White Male Suffrage’ is five songs of rants about various things that are annoying – Sexism, Boris Johnson and his Brexit bullshit, Morrissey’s continual downfall into a void of far right tactlessness, Boring comments Vegans/Vegetarians hear and Trumps plans to get into our NHS. We don’t ‘know it all’ and get it right every time, but nobody does, and our opinions have heart at the very least.
We think this one shows our more complex sound whilst retaining that energy and anger from ‘U OK Hun?’. We recorded the instruments in our practice room above a pub in Blackpool and the vocals were recorded in a cupboard under Shaun’s stairs at his house. We finished the vocals a few days before the lockdown happened so we were quite lucky to have that done in time.

Which ones would you consider your main influences both music-wise & non-music-wise?

BP: It’s probably a basic generic reply but everyone does like different music, I played in post-rock bands a lot before this so I do like music that uses progressive structures and time signatures out outside of 4/4 a lot – stuff like And So I Watch You From Afar, Battles and Alpha Male Tea Party. I like shouty hardcore as well – Fugazi, Quicksand, yourcodenameis:milo, Hell Is For Heroes, JOHN and Reuben. So our sound is a mix of that.
IDLES were lyrically an influence, I like that voice, open brutal raw emotion the delves into subject matters like depression and negative emotions but also challenges the current political landscape.

CS: Musically; first wave/Proto Punk, Garage, Doo-Wop/surf and 60’s rocksteady. I’m a simpleton who likes stuff I can sing along with & generally been in bands who stuck rather militantly to these formulas. Being in this band, I’ve been throughly put through my paces with structurally complex music, it’s been fun to have to basically un-learn how to play 4/4 and long may it continue.

Pot & pan wise, Rat Scabies, Ginger Baker, Johnny Blitz, Billy Cobham, D.H Peligro, Buddy Rich. Christian Grahn (The Hives) is also currently the most criminally underrated drummer in the world, in my opinion. He’s a human metronome. I saw The Hives when I was a young’un and witnessing how frenetic, yet disciplined & creative he was with such a limited set-up made me want to have a pop at it.

In what way does your sound differ from the rest genre-related artists/bands and why should we listen to your music? In other words, how would you describe your sound?

BP: We don’t have a template to when it comes to songs, our songs don’t always sound like each other and we challenge ourselves when writing and try new and more complex ways to approach song writing. We are not trying to be anything specific and there’s an honesty to our music. It’s not written to the standards that ensure you get radio play, it’s just us expressing ourselves.

We push ourselves whilst song writing, always finding challenging time signatures and trying to avoid the classic song structure template and we think the end results sound refreshing.

Someone who heard ‘Carnibores’ off the new EP said ‘you can never guess where it’s going to go’ – which I liked.

Please name your 3 desert islands albums, movies & books…

BP: Albums – David Bowie ‘Low’, And So I Watch You From Afar ‘Gangs’, yourcodenameis:milo ‘Ignoto’

Books – Hunter S Thompson ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’, Irvine Welsh ‘Skagboys’, JRR Tolkien ‘The Lord of the Rings’

Movies: Scott Pilgrim vs the World, The Empire Strikes Back, Princess Mononoke

CS: Albums – The Damned ‘The Black Album’, Eels ‘Beautiful Freak’, Dead Kennedys ‘Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables’.

Books – Robert Hughes ‘The Fatal Shore, ‘Irvine Welsh ‘Skagboys’, Steve Jones ‘Lonely Boy’.

Movies: Alien, As Good As It Gets, Withnail & I.

Do you prefer studio or performing live and why?

BP: Studio, I’m not always great in crowds of people and not always comfortable holding peoples attention.

CS: Live, for the adrenaline & ability to recover if you bugger something up, as nobody will notice. If I mess something up in a studio and it takes ages to re-do, I’m mentally slapping myself for hours.

Is there any funny-unique story you would like to share with us, always in relation to your music ‘career’?

BP: When we play people seem to think we will be these louder than life sort of loud and angry characters in person off stage. But we are pretty quiet, insecure and withdrawn so it’s funny the way people react to us off stage when they talk to us.

Which track of your own would you point out as the most unique and why?

BP: I think they are, mostly, all unique (generic answer again) – maybe ‘Un-cooperative Crusties’ it’s not been recorded yet but it’s our first attempt at trying a polyrhythm and has no repeating sections. Whenever we have played it live people have said it was their favourite song from the set.

Would you like to share with our readers your future plans?

BP: Well we had a lot of gigs planned but that’s all blown out of the water now due to the COVID problems, we got on at Rebellion Festival in Blackpool which is a huge punk festival at the Winter Gardens but that along with everything else has been cancelled. The pub where we practice is closed at the moment as well but we are hoping to get back in there for July, as long as we can keep people safe. We have new song ideas recorded at home during lockdown so I guess we will just finish writing those together this year when we can get back into our rehearsal space. Just writing until we can do gigs again. I hope we will end up recording another EP before the end of the year as there’s not much else to do sadly.

Free question!!! (Ask yourself a question) you wish to answer and haven’t been given the opportunity…

BP: What does your bass player keep under his beard?

He actually has a second face under there, It’s not his face though – we don’t know whose face it is. It is pretty handy when we want to try some barbershop quartet material as the second face has a lovely tenor voice.

Curated by: Christos Doukakis

Recommended listening:

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